Classic Monsters

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Classic Monsters

Frankenstein’s Monster
Frankenstein (novel, 1818), Frankenstein (film, 1931)
Dracula
Dracula (novel, 1897), Dracula (film, 1931)
Invisible Man
The Invisible Man (novel, 1897), The Invisible Man (film, 1933)
Phantom of the Opera
Le Fantôme de l'Opéra (1909), The Phantom of the Opera (1925)
Nosferatu
Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror (1922)
Igor
Frankenstein (1931), Young Frankenstein (1974)
Bride of Frankenstein
Bride of Frankenstein (1935)
Wolf Man
The Wolf Man (1941)
Gort
The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)
Creature from the Black Lagoon
Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)
Vampira
The Vampira Show (1954)

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Vampira
Dimensioned drawings of Vampira posing in a variety of standing postures

Vampira is a campy creation of actress Maila Nurmi in the 1950s. Inspired by Mortica Addams, Nurmi created a spooky horror television host. On her show, The Vampira Show, Nurmi would introduce different horror films, feign speaking with spirits, and play with her pet spider, Rolo. The show aired from 1954 to 1955 exclusively in Los Angeles, but Vampira’s instantaneous success outlived the life of the show with her being featured in films past the cancellation of the show. The Vampira Show is now regarded as a cult classic and created fan clubs worldwide.

Vampira, created and portrayed by Maila Nurmi, is 5 foot 7 inches (1.70 m) tall.

Vampira is a campy creation of actress Maila Nurmi in the 1950s. Inspired by Mortica Addams, Nurmi created a spooky horror television host. On her show, The Vampira Show, Nurmi would introduce different horror films, feign speaking with spirits, and play with her pet spider, Rolo.

Vampira, created and portrayed by Maila Nurmi, is 5 foot 7 inches (1.70 m) tall.

Phantom of the Opera
Series of dimensioned height drawings of the original and modern Phantom of the Opera viewed from the front

The Phantom of the Opera, also known as Erik and referred to as The Phantom, is a character from Gaston Leroux’s novel Le Fantôme de l’Opéra from 1909, which has been remade into a movie and musical. Erik is a mysterious, deformed man who haunts a Parisian opera house and falls in love with one of the stars of the show, Christine. Erik captures her during one of the shows after learning she has betrayed him and planned to run away with her lover, Raoul. While holding Christine captive and coercing her into marriage, Raoul and a Persian policeman attempt to rescue her. However they fall into many of Erik’s traps. The Phantom also threatens to blow up the entire opera house, but Christine keeps this plan by cooperating with Erik. Depending on the version (novel, film, or musical), Erik either lets Christine go with Raoul or is bludgeoned to death on the banks of the scenic Seine river by an angry mob.

The Phantom of the Opera, originally portrayed by Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera (1925), is 6 foot 2 inches (1.88 m) tall.

The Phantom of the Opera, also known as Erik, is a character from Gaston Leroux’s novel Le Fantôme de l’Opéra (1909), which has been remade into a movie and musical. Erik is a mysterious, deformed man who haunts a Parisian opera house and falls in love with one of the stars of the show, Christine.

The Phantom of the Opera, originally portrayed by Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera (1925), is 6 foot 2 inches (1.88 m) tall.

Bride of Frankenstein
Pair of drawings of the Bride of Frankenstein standing from the front and side views with overall height

The Bride of Frankenstein is a character briefly introduced in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and fully brought to life in the film sequel The Bride of Frankenstein in 1935. In the novel, reluctant Henry Frankenstein agrees to make a mate for his monster through coercion of the monster, but destroys his work before she is brought to life. In retaliation, the monster kills Frankenstein’s wife. In the film, Henry Frankenstein completes his female creation, but like the townspeople before her, she is disgusted by the monster and refuses his advances. The film ends with the monster destroying the lab with him and her in it while Henry and his wife escape.

The Bride of Frankenstein, portrayed by Elsa Lanchester in The Bride of Frankenstein (1935), is 7 foot (2.13 m) tall. Elsa Lanchester is only 5 foot 7 inches (1.70 m) tall, but she was lifted on stilts for the role.

The Bride of Frankenstein is a character introduced in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and brought to life in the film sequel The Bride of Frankenstein in 1935. In the novel, reluctant Henry Frankenstein agrees to make a mate for his monster, but destroys his work before she is brought to life.

The Bride of Frankenstein, portrayed by Elsa Lanchester in The Bride of Frankenstein (1935), is 7 foot (2.13 m) tall. Elsa Lanchester is only 5 foot 7 inches (1.70 m) tall, but she was lifted on stilts for the role.

Igor
Dimensioned collection of illustrations of Igor in a range of postures from standing upright to hunched and walking

Igor is a generic hunchbacked henchman trope character that appears in a variety of films as a servant to the main antagonist. The very first appearance of an Igor character was in the 1927 film Metropolis, though the character is never named or credited. The next, and most notable, appearance of Igor was in the 1931 film Frankenstein. However, the character’s name was actually Fritz and in Mary Shelley’s original novel Frankenstein did not have an assistant. Despite the inconsistencies in the actual names of the henchmen or their roles, the name Igor, or stylized as Ygor, appears to be the default nickname for all horror assistants.

Igor, portrayed by Marty Feldman in Young Frankenstein (1974), is 5 foot 7 inches (1.70 m) tall.

Igor is a generic hunchbacked henchman trope character that appears in a variety of films as a servant to the main antagonist. Despite the inconsistencies in the actual names of the henchmen or their roles, the name Igor appears to be the default nickname for all horror assistants.

Igor, portrayed by Marty Feldman in Young Frankenstein (1974), is 5 foot 7 inches (1.70 m) tall.

Creature from the Black Lagoon
Series of illustrations of the Creature from the Black Lagoon drawn from the front and side views with overall height

Creature from The Black Lagoon, a movie released in 1954, stars the antagonist and monster Gill-Man. Gill-Man is a fully amphibious creature so he can breathe both underwater and above ground. Gill-Man has webbed hands with claws and tough, thick skin that can regenerate and heal rapidly allowing him to recover from attacks that would be deadly to humans. Gill-Man lives in the Black Lagoon at the end of a tributary in the Amazon and is obsessed with a female crew member, Kay, on a geology expedition. Gill-Man attacks the other crew members and abducts Kay, but she is rescued by the remaining crew. When she is saved, Gill-Man is riddled with bullets by the crew and sinks back into the depths of the lagoon.

The Creature from the Black Lagoon, portrayed by Ben Chapman in Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954), is 6 foot 5 inches (1.96 m) tall.

Creature from The Black Lagoon, a movie released in 1954, stars the antagonist and monster Gill-Man. Gill-Man is a fully amphibious creature so he can breathe both underwater and above ground. Gill-Man has webbed hands with claws and tough, thick skin that can regenerate and heal rapidly.

The Creature from the Black Lagoon, portrayed by Ben Chapman in Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954), is 6 foot 5 inches (1.96 m) tall.

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